Thursday, July 30, 2009

Should I be buying pomega5 ultra green skin care products now?

In good times: Confidence swells.

We all know what happens when the economy hums: A lot of what businesspeople try works. AIG discovers a profitable market in insuring dicey securities. General Motors sells lots of gas-guzzling sport utility vehicles. Innovation and entrepreneurialism flourish because the odds of success rise. And confidence climbs higher — often, as we can now see so clearly, dangerously high. “There’s evidence that in good times, suddenly everyone thinks that they’re better than everyone else,” says Don Moore, an associate professor of organizational behavior and theory at Carnegie Mellon’s Tepper School of Business. “On average, that’s just not true.”

Our problem? We can’t easily view our achievements with anything approaching objectivity. In a study on confidence published last year, Moore gave participants 18 computer-based trivia quizzes and then asked them how well they did. Turns out, most were horrible at assessing their performances — about 90 percent of the subjects guessed wrong about how they did.

Hubris and delusion, as you might imagine, are a dangerous combination. When things are going gangbusters, the truth is we get too full of ourselves. Our confidence has us looking at our businesses through rose-colored lenses.

In stable times: Overconfidence dictates.
When business is OK but unspectacular, we get conservative. We lean on practices that served us well during the earlier boom. Our confidence lies in the fact that we know what works, and we stick with it.
But that confidence can lead us astray again, as we adopt the false belief that experience can replace effort. Veteran cops do this: Moore cites well-known research in which seasoned policemen frequently erred in determining whether or not suspects were telling the truth. The related study, titled “Who Can Catch a Liar,” proves that few folks really can. Experience, it turns out, counts for little. “If I teach the same class for 10 years and start failing to prepare, then my performance suffers,” Moore says. “You have to find that sweet spot: sufficient poise to work with what you’ve already got, and sufficient anxiety to invest time and energy into your work.”
In downturns: Confidence evaporates.
Here’s where we are now. The economy has tanked. People are paying off mortgages worth far more than their homes; folks are out of work. Those still on the job, including company management, walk around office hallways with their heads down, in part because they fear becoming the next casualty.
Again, Moore says that confidence — really, the lack thereof — is misleading, slightly out of whack with reality. Yes, the national unemployment rate is a sobering 8.5 percent, but that means the employment rate is still 91.5 percent. Real estate is cheap, certainly compared with a few years ago, when those looking for homes bemoaned the sky-high prices. Weaker businesses are ripe for acquisition.
You have to look at the proverbial glass as half-full. “These days, I bet there are a lot of managers imagining that they’re not doing well, and that others are doing better,” says Moore. “On average? That’s untrue.”
Confidence experts say that in these stressful times, leaders need to be level-headed and courageous. Be brutally honest with yourself and others, and get comfortable with making changes and even going against the grain. Marriott, for instance, recently took what could be viewed as a leap of faith when it agreed to buy West Virginia’s iconic and bankrupt Greenbrier resort. In the long run, the hotel’s estimated $130 million price tag could very well represent a bargain. “This is a time to do things even if you don’t want to do them,” says Marina Gorbis, who runs the Institute for the Future, a Silicon Valley think tank. “This is a time for heroic actions.”

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Skin care advice and omega 5 oil products by POMEGA5

The Basic 4-Step Skincare Regimen
Step 1: Cleansing Simple is key here. You need to find a good cleanser that your skin responds well to, and stick with it.

You can find a good cleanser at the drugstore. There's no need to spend $40 on a fancy wash. Avoid bar soaps as they tend to dry out the skin. According to Rona Berg, in her book, "Beauty," a French cosmetics executive once told her "soap should only ever touch your skin from the neck down." We agree. Choose instead a creamy cleanser if you have dry skin or a cleanser without oil if you have oily skin.
Be careful not to cleanse too often. Washing at night should do you. While some skincare experts swear you should cleanse skin with creamy cleansers that you wipe off with a tissue, never letting water touch your skin (some hard waters are especially hard on skin), we prefer the water method. In the morning, a splash of lukewarm water is all you need (we find it's great for removing excess oils from your nightly moisturizing). Never wash your face with hot or cold water (both can cause broken capillaries). Also be careful about overcleansing skin. Here's the best way to wash your face: Use warm water to loosen dirt and clogged pores. Use a dime-sized bit of cleanser, then rinse with cool or lukewarm water. You'll also want to take off your makeup with a proper makeup remover.
Step 2: ExfoliateExfoliation is the step most people skip in their weekly skincare routine. If you start properly exfoliating your skin, you will notice an almost immediate difference. According to Berg, one of the reasons men's skin looks more youthful than women's is because men tend to exfoliate daily when they shave. There are several ways to exfoliate skin: Microdermabrasion, chemical peels and retinoids.
Scrubs work by removing the top layer of dead skin cells that tend to dull your complexion. We find exfoliating skin once a week with a microdermabrasion kit keeps skin glowing year-round. Make sure you use a gentle scrub with tiny grains. Big grains in cheap scrubs can tear skin and cause more harm than good. Try some over-the-counter peels that work over the course of a month. "Collagen is the skin's structural fiber," dermatologist Dennis Gross said in O Magazine. "As we get older, it breaks down, creating lines and large pores." Skincare experts disagree on all sorts of things, but most of them consider retinoids to be a miracle skin saver. Should you use a toner? Some people swear by toners, but many beauty experts do not (I once read a skincare expert claim, "toners are only for copy machines"). Toners are meant to remove all remaining traces of oil, makeup and dirt, but a good cleanser should do this. I firmly believe it's up to you. If you like the way your skin feels with a toner. Buy it. Use it. Enjoy it.
Step 3: Moisturize While I know of at least one famous beauty editor who swore skin doesn't need moisturizer, basically everyone else I've read disagrees and is an adamant believer in it. A basic law of beauty is that everyone, no matter her skin type, should moisturize. Even if your skin is oily, it will benefit from moiturizers. (The only exception is those with acne). Why? Moisturizers seal moisture into skin (Berg calls this the "Saran Wrap effect"). So how much should you moisturize? Your skin will tell you. When your skin is tight, it's crying out for moisture. Be careful not to overmoisturize -- this can cause clogged pores.
Are eye creams necessary? Well maybe. Some beauty experts strongly recommend eye creams. Why? The skin around the eye contains no fatty tissue and is therefore very thin and susceptible to wrinkles. Special eye creams are formulated to 'thicken' this area and keep it sturdy. Yet other experts (including the beauty editors of Allure in their new book) claim your daily lotion works around the eyes just as well.
Step 4: Apply Sunscreen 'O' magazine ran an article featuring interviews with several top skin care experts and dermatologists. Every single one of them said sunscreen was the most important part of your skincare regimen. It was the secret they would pass on to their daughters. The number 1 cause of wrinkles is sun damage, so it's important to use sunscreen from your early years on even in winter and on cloudy days. A great trick is to purchase two moisturizers: one for night and one for day that includes UV protection. Don't use moisturizers with sunscreen at night, the ingredients are not meant to be used 27/7 and can aggravate skin. When choosing a sunscreen, make sure it contains Mexoryl.

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Tuesday, July 28, 2009

Omega 5 oil and SPF

You are religiously wearing SPF all year round? But are you really sure you are protected from sun damage?Here are some tips:* Make sure your are protected from both UVA and UVB rays. UVB (burning) has a wavelength range (in nanometers) of: 280-320UVA (aging) has a wavelength range (in nanometers) of: 320-400Read the label to find out what spectrum of UV rays a sunscreen blocks.* Choose the right ingredient. Various sunscreen ingredients are capable of covering various spectrum of sunrays. Two ingredients that cover the widest spectrum used in sunscreen nowadays include Zinc Oxide (physical blocker) and Mexoryl (chemical blocker). Many products combine several sunscreen ingredients to cover a wider range of sun spectrum.* Apply sunscreen liberally and evenly. Studies show that the average person uses much less sunscreen than the amount needed to achieve the SPF shown on the label. Apply chemical sunscreens 15-30 minutes before sun exposure, physical sunscreens offer immediate protection. * Keep reapplying your sunscreen. Certain sun screening ingredients, such as Avobensene for example, are not photo-stable and tend to break down after a certain time making your skin vulnerable to sun rays. Reapply every two hours. However if you are you are swimming or exercising reapply more often.* Don’t forget your ears. Don't forget to apply sunscreen to areas that are commonly neglected, like the ears, hands, neck, and feet.* Make use of SPF in your makeup. If you can’t reapply sunblock or your moisturizer during the day, use additional makeup such as foundation and powder with SPF and keep refreshing it* Stay out of the sun. No sunscreen can block UV rays 100%. So make sure you are wearing hat with wide brims, long sleeves, sunglasses and don’t spend much time in the direct sun. Make sure to stay out of the sun during the ours of its highest activity (generally between 11 am and 3 pm)
Omega 5 oil is a natural SPF ingredient

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